Save the date - Security Informatics mingle coming up

Save the date!

Tuesday April 18th, SAISec will be hosting an evening networking activity in Stockholm for current students of Information Security as well as industry professionals.

Drop a line to info@saisec.se for more info.

Security Mingle: "Thesis and Future"

Save the date! On April 18th, SAISec will be hosting a "security mingle" in central Stockholm for new and (slightly) older students of Security Informatics at DSV.

It will be an opportunity for current Master's students to present their thesis, grab a sandwich, meet with some of us already in the industry and do a bit of networking.

Watch this space for more info!

25 years later

25 years is not bad for an alumni association. Founded in 1991, SAISec has remained at the forefront of advocating InfoSec research at Stockholm University.

Data breaches in resourceful organisations is a constant reminder that applied InfoSec is not working. Vendors claim that their latest-and-greatest product is the silver bullet we need. If products had been the solution, we would not be in this mess.

25 years later, the need for InfoSec research remains clear. The voice of SAISec is still needed.


Around the table, from the left: Perry, Tove, Yngve, Christina, Päivi, Louise, Jesper and Per. (Photo by Baris.)

meet the board: Christina Gustavsson


Christina Gustavsson, business consultant, sometimes with assignments in Information Security. I studied InfoSec at DSV after the turn of the century and have worked as an information security coordinator. To me, the most interesting and challenging aspect of InfoSec is to actually improve the security of organizations in practice. To create safe and effective technical solutions and processes, and also to succeed in changing people's behavior.
I think SAISec's primary role is to be an arena or network where professionals - former security students - can meet ongoing research in academia for the benefit and pleasure of both parties.

what works?

The field of Information Security is not sufficiently understood.

The domain has existed for a few decades, during which time a dramatic shift has occurred in the ways we create, transmit, process and store information. (As an example, consider recent changes in how the average household uses photography.)

We need more research, more and better education, but also more and better interaction between academia and practitioners. What works, asks the criminologist. And so should we be asking in InfoSec.